April 15, 2014

The Dracula Cookbook by Eadaoin Flynn
Specially for @assassins-phantomas-mutantes who kindly shared with us a 10 cookbooks that have stayed with you list ^_^

The Dracula Cookbook by Eadaoin Flynn

Specially for @assassins-phantomas-mutantes who kindly shared with us a 10 cookbooks that have stayed with you list ^_^

April 15, 2014

The world of books (by sanja.stanisic)

The world of books (by sanja.stanisic)

(via mybooksandi)

April 15, 2014

soarry:

I will know my life is successful when I have a library with a rolling ladder

(via rockford1)

April 15, 2014
gigoua:

Bibliothèque de l’Assemblée Nationale (at Assemblée nationale)

gigoua:

Bibliothèque de l’Assemblée Nationale (at Assemblée nationale)

(via katetherose)

April 15, 2014

bookshavepores:
Woop! I call this the I-survived-the-apocalypse (well, it was a bad storm. realllly bad) and-don’t-have-classes-till-next-week haul! Also, I framed more crochet flowers because apparently that’s what you do when you can’t leave the house for days. Crafts!

bookshavepores:

Woop! I call this the I-survived-the-apocalypse (well, it was a bad storm. realllly bad) and-don’t-have-classes-till-next-week haul! Also, I framed more crochet flowers because apparently that’s what you do when you can’t leave the house for days. Crafts!

April 15, 2014

(Source: i-doll, via classiclibrarian)

April 15, 2014

erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

April 15, 2014
bookpatrol:

L’Artisan du Livre, 2 Rue de Fleurus, Paris (c.1930) 

bookpatrol:

L’Artisan du Livre, 2 Rue de Fleurus, Paris (c.1930) 

April 15, 2014

(Source: peaceeeee-and-pornnn, via goodmorninghouseplants)

April 15, 2014

Jour apres jour… by Andréa Clantin
on tumblr: http://andreaclantin.tumblr.com/

Jour apres jour… by Andréa Clantin

on tumblr: http://andreaclantin.tumblr.com/